Faroe Islands or the Faeroes (derived from Old Norse for Island of Sheep) is a group of 18 islands stranded in the North Atlantic. Lying between Iceland and Norway, on the north side of Scotland, the Faroe Islands is a wet and windy archipelago warmed by the Gulf stream. Stunning cliffs and wide green hills dominate the landscape of this land of fishing. Faroese and Danish are the official languages. The currency is the Faroese Króna (DKK). Faroe Islands is a part of Denmark.
 

TÓRSHAVN

1 399 km²

49 200

FAROE ISLANDS

EXPLORE

Faroe Island waterfall
faroe island
Froðba
Mist in Faroe Islands
Faroe Island village
Sørvágsvatn

The Faroe Islands, located 320km off the Scottish coast, are characterised by their rugged and rocky geography. The climate is described as windy, wet, cloudy and cool - much like Scotland. The islands are remote, but beautiful in their untamed wilderness. The towering rocks and crashing waves are almost mythical in appearance.

VIEWS

GÁSADALUR

A village of about a dozen people in the western island of Vágar, Gásadalur stands in a stunning position between the two highest mountain of the country and massive vertical cliffs to the sea. This tiny but iconic village has grandious views and a rich history of folklores.

Website: visitfaroeislands.com/gasadalur

Vágar Island

SIGHTSEEING

THE FAROE ISLANDERS

The Faroese people are of Norse and Celtic descent, and speak their own language, Faroese. They are huge lovers of sport, especially football, with 7,000 registered players out of the whole population of 50,000. Their long isolation from mainland Europe means that whole cultural phases and movements effectively passed them by, and therefore they have maintained much of their traditional culture, in the form of Faroese dancing, dress and sagas.

Thus the Faroe Islanders place a lot of importance on tradition, family and loyalty, as befits a small and isolated community – they stick together! They may seem shy at first – the islands don’t get too many visitors – but they are a warm, compassionate and extremely hospitable people.

The islanders don’t beat around the bush, they are genuine and really mean what they say. So, if you get invited to a fishing trip or a home dinner, it’s not just an empty platitude.

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

EXPLORE

  • Black Instagram Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
Follow us on social media for interesting
Nordic facts and beautiful landscapes.

© Norrfolket

Sørvágsvatn